P'shat is where we gain simple understandings. Kindergarten and 1st graders should start here. 

Each time you master a learning goal and "SHOW what you KNOW" you earn a point. Master all of the learning goals for each theme and you earn a learning badge celebrating all you've accomplished.

 

Each year, there are a maximum of 49 points you can earn in each level of the PaRDeS. In Judaism, the number 49 symbolizes the highest level of spiritual attainment possible for humans.​

1. I know the symbols and ritual items used on the Yamim Noraim 
The Yamim Noraim (High Holy Days) have lots of different symbols and ritual items. Each one helps us welcome the new year in its own special way.
PRACTICE makes PERFECT

Click on each holiday symbol below to find out what it is. Do you know when we use each of these symbols? Do you know what they symbolize?

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PRACTICE makes PERFECT

See if you can match the symbols to their meanings.

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SHOW what you KNOW

Create a High Holy Day symbol book with pictures and/or drawings of each symbol and the name of each symbol. When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

2. I can put the fall holidays in order
All of the Yamim Noraim are celebrated in the fall during the Hebrew month of Tishrei. Rosh Hashanah comes first on the 1st and 2nd day of Tishrei. Yom Kippur is on the 10th. Sukkot begins 5 days later on the 15th and lasts for 8 days. Simchat Torah comes right after Sukkot on the 23rd of Tishrei.
PRACTICE makes PERFECT

Let's take a trip through the Yamim Noraim. Make sure you fly in the right order!

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Now see if you can put all the Jewish holidays in order starting with Rosh Hashanah.

SHOW what you KNOW

Create your own calendar for this month and put in all of the Yamim Noraim on the correct date. Why not make it fancy with pictures! When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

3. I can use the Hebrew names of the holiday

The Jewish New Year is called Rosh Hashanah. The Day of Atonement, the holiest day of the year, is called Yom Kippur. The Festival of Booths is known as Sukkot and the celebration of the Torah is called Simchat Torah.

PRACTICE makes PERFECT
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See if you know the Hebrew names of all of the holidays.

SHOW what you KNOW

Create a High Holy Day greeting card using the Hebrew names of the holidays. When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

4. I can match each holiday with its appropriate season

All of the Yamim Noraim (Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur, Sukkot and Simchat Torah) are celebrated in the fall when the leaves are changing colors and apples and pumpkins are ready to be picked in the fields. We can think of them as the "fall festivals." We celebrate this season by eating apples on Rosh Hashanah and decorating our sukkot with pumpkins, gourds and more during Sukkot.

PRACTICE makes PERFECT

Take our holiday quiz to see how much you know about the Yamim Noraim and their season.

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SHOW what you KNOW

Create a nature collage celebrating the Yamim Noraim and their season. When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

5. I can recite the holiday b’rachot (blessings)

There is a special blessing that we say when we do something for the first time in a new year. Since everything we do on Rosh Hashanah is new its a great time to say "Shehecheyanu." On Sukkot, in addition to Shehecheyanu, there is a blessing just for sitting in the sukkah. Imagine that - a blessing just for sitting! There is also a blessing when you shake the lulav and etrog.

PRACTICE makes PERFECT

Listen to these blessings and try to sing along.

SHOW what you KNOW

Create your own audio recordings of the blessings to use at home. When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

6. I can match the rituals with each holiday

Every holiday has its own special customs and rituals. On Rosh Hashanah we eat apples dipped in honey and hear the shofar. On Yom Kippur we don't eat any food. On Sukkot we sit and eat in a sukkah and shake lulav and etrog. Finally on Simchat Torah we dance around with the Torah.

PRACTICE makes PERFECT

Watch these videos to learn about the holiday rituals.

SHOW what you KNOW

Make your own video tutorial about the rituals and symbols of the Yamim Noraim. When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

7. I can connect Jewish values to the holidays

Middot are Jewish values. A value is a belief or behavior that we all believe is important. Some Jewish values are kindness, bravery and love. You can find a list of many more middot below. Think about all that you've learned about the Yamim Noraim. What values do you think are important for these holidays? What values to these holidays inspire us to act on? 

PRACTICE makes PERFECT
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SHOW what you KNOW

Print out our list of middot (plural of middah), cut each middah out, and create a poster for each holiday celebrating its values. When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

CONGRATULATIONS!
If you've completed all of the challenges above and you've "SHOWN  what you KNOW" then you've earned the "RENEWAL" badge!
 
1. I can describe the Torah as a scroll that has five books
PRACTICE makes PERFECT

The Torah contains the Five Books of Moses. These five books (B'reisheet, Sh'mot, Vayikra, Bamidbar and Devarim) tell the story of the Creation of the world and the birth of the Jewish people. A Torah is written on a scroll by a trained expert called a Sofer, or scribe. 

SHOW what you KNOW

Create a story about anything you want with five parts representing the five books of the Torah​. Just like the Torah, write and illustrate your five-part story in a scroll. When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

2. I can show my understanding that a portion (or selection) from the Torah is read each week in synagogue

Each week we read a different portion from the Torah scroll. Each portion is called a "parsha." There are 54 parshiot (portions) in the Torah. Since there are only 52 weeks in the year, sometimes we read a double-portion.​

PRACTICE makes PERFECT

Click on our Parsha Picker to see all of the Parshiot.

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SHOW what you KNOW

After watching a couple of the parsha videos in "Practice makes Perfect" choose one parsha and create a comic strip with pictures telling the story of that parsha. When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

3. I can use the words "Torah" and "parsha" in proper contexts
PRACTICE makes PERFECT

Now that you know what the Torah is and what a parsha is, see if you can fill out this Madlibs using these two key words.

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SHOW what you KNOW

Create your own Mad Libs about the Torah and the parshiot in the Torah. When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

4. I show appropriate behavior around a Torah scroll

Because the Torah is so special to the Jewish people we behave differently around it than we do when we're playing soccer, doing gymnastics or even just playing with our friends. We always want to show respect to the Torah.

PRACTICE makes PERFECT

See if you know how to show respect to the Torah. Just put each action in right category.

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SHOW what you KNOW

Create a list of rules for how you think we should treat the Torah. When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

5. I can ask good questions about the Torah stories

The most important part of Torah study is asking questions. And the best kinds of questions are "why" and "how" questions. Why did God say that? Why did Moses do this? How was Miriam feeling about this? When you learn about a story from the Torah, make sure to ask lots of questions!

SHOW what you KNOW

Come up with a list of three amazing questions you have about your favorite story from the Torah. When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

CONGRATULATIONS!
If you've completed all of the challenges above and you've "SHOWN  what you KNOW" then you've earned the "LEARNING" badge!
 
1. I know the symbols and ritual items used on Shabbat 
PRACTICE makes PERFECT

Click on each Shabbat symbol below to find out what it is. Do you know when we use each of these symbols? Do you know what they symbolize?

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PRACTICE makes PERFECT

See if you can match the symbols to their meanings.

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SHOW what you KNOW

Create a Shabbat symbol book with pictures and/or drawings of each symbol and the name of each symbol. When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

2. I can put the parts of the story of Creation and Shabbat in the correct order
Shabbat is the seventh day of the Creation of the world. After making light and darkness; waters below and heavens above; land and oceans; sun, moon and stars; birds and fish; animals and people - God saw all that God had created and said that it was "good." Then God rested from all of God's work and gave us the gift of Shabbat so we could rest from our work as well. 
PRACTICE makes PERFECT

Click to play our Creation game and see if you can put the days of Creation in the right order.

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SHOW what you KNOW

Create your own Creation Quiz and see how many people in your family know the story of Creation. When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

3. I can use the Hebrew names of the holiday

Shabbat in Hebrew is called, well..."Shabbat!" Some people call it "Shabbos," which is really the same thing as "Shabbat." The word "Shabbat" in Hebrew is spelled שבת and it means "rest."

SHOW what you KNOW

Create Shabbat-o-gram to send to someone special using the Hebrew name of Shabbat. When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

4. I can match Shabbat with its appropriate season

Shabbat is the only holiday that is celebrated every single week of the year. Shabbat is the 7th day of the week and no matter if its warm or chilly, rainy or sunny - Shabbat always comes! Shabbat begins on Friday evening and ends on Saturday night. That's because, when God was creating each day, God said, "There was EVENING and there was MORNING..." Did you notice how God said "evening" before "morning"? That teaches us that a Jewish day actually begins in the evening, not in the morning.

PRACTICE makes PERFECT

Check out this Jewish calendar. What do you see on Fridays that tells you when Shabbat starts? What do you see on Saturdays that tells you when Shabbat ends?

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SHOW what you KNOW

Create a picture showing how Shabbat begins when the sun goes down on Friday and ends when the sun goes down on Saturday. When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

5. I can recite the Shabbat b’rachot (blessings)

Shabbat begins on Friday evenings. We light two candles, drink wine or grape juice and share challah. Practice the blessings so you can help make Shabbat beautiful with your whole family.

PRACTICE makes PERFECT

Listen to these blessings and try to sing along.

SHOW what you KNOW

Create your own audio recordings of the blessings to use at home. When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

6. I can identify the rituals that we do on Shabbat.

Shabbat is the most special day of the week. There are lots of things we do differently on Shabbat. There are also many things that we try not to do. 

PRACTICE makes PERFECT

Watch the video below to learn about Shabbat rituals.

Let's play a game. Click on the "Play Now" button and play our Remembering and Observing Shabbat game.

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SHOW what you KNOW

Make your own video tutorial about how to welcome Shabbat with the appropriate symbols and rituals. When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

7. I can connect Jewish values to Shabbat.

Middot are Jewish values. A value is a belief or behavior that we all believe is important. Some Jewish values are kindness, bravery and love. You can find a list of many more middot below. Think about all that you've learned about the Yamim Noraim. What values do you think are important for these holidays? What values to these holidays inspire us to act on? 

PRACTICE makes PERFECT
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SHOW what you KNOW

Print out our list of middot (plural of middah), cut each middah out, and create a poster celebrating Shabbat's values. When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

CONGRATULATIONS!
If you've completed all of the challenges above and you've "SHOWN  what you KNOW" then you've earned the "HOLINESS" badge!
 
1. I know the symbols and ritual items used on Chanukah 
PRACTICE makes PERFECT

Click on each holiday symbol below to find out what it is. Do you know when we use each of these symbols? Do you know what they symbolize?

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PRACTICE makes PERFECT

See if you can match the symbols to their meanings.

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SHOW what you KNOW

Create a Chanukah symbol book with pictures and/or drawings of each symbol and the name of each symbol. When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

2. I can put the parts of the story of Chanukah in the correct order

The Chanukah story tells the tale of the Jews living in Israel when the Antiochus, the Greek leader decided he didn't want anyone living Jewishly anymore. Some Jews went along with this crazy idea just to keep the peace but others, led by the Maccabees, decided to fight against it.

After a terrible battle, the Maccabees overpowered the Greeks and got their Temple back. There was a lot of cleaning up to do and only enough oil for the lamp for one day. Thankfully, a miracle occurred and the oil lasted for eight days.

PRACTICE makes PERFECT

Check out this video of the Chanukah story

See if you can put the parts of the Chanukah story in the right order.

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SHOW what you KNOW

Create a story board for the story of Chanukah. Why not make it fancy with pictures! When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

3. I can use the Hebrew names of the holiday

חֲנֻכָּה (Chanukah) means "re-dedication" and it reminds us of how the Maccabees cleaned up the Temple in Jerusalem and re-dedicated it for use. Chanukah is also called חַג אוּרִים (Chag Urim), which means, "the festival of lights."

PRACTICE makes PERFECT
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See if you know the Hebrew names of all of the holidays.

SHOW what you KNOW

Create a Chanukah greeting card incorporating the two names of the holiday.​ When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

4. I can match Chanukah with its appropriate season

Chanukah begins on the 25th day of the Hebrew month of Kislev. It comes at the darkest time of the year - just when we need more light! Chanukah lasts for eight days. Jews aren't the only ones who celebrate a festival of lights at the darkest time of the year.

PRACTICE makes PERFECT

How many different "festival of light" holidays can you see in the picture below?

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SHOW what you KNOW

Create a nature collage celebrating Chanukah and its season. When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

5. I can recite the holiday b’rachot (blessings)

There are two blessings we say when lighting the Chanukiyah (three blessings on the first night.) The first blessing thanks God for commanding us to light the Chanukiyah. The second blessing thanks God for all the miracles happening all around us all the time. The third blessing, said only on the first night is the Shehecheyanu blessing, thanking God for letting us reach this special moment.

PRACTICE makes PERFECT

Listen to these blessings and try to sing along.

SHOW what you KNOW

Create your own audio recordings of the blessings to use at home. When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

6. I can identify the rituals that we do on Chanukah

On Chanukah we light the Chanukiyah each night for eight nights, we play s'vivon (dreidel), and eat levivot (latkes) and sufganiyot (jelly donuts.) And, of course, we exchange gifts!

PRACTICE makes PERFECT

Watch this video to learn about the holiday rituals.

SHOW what you KNOW

Make your own video tutorial about the rituals of Chanukah. When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

7. I can connect Jewish values to the holidays

Middot are Jewish values. A value is a belief or behavior that we all believe is important. Some Jewish values are kindness, bravery and love. You can find a list of many more middot below. Think about all that you've learned about the Yamim Noraim. What values do you think are important for these holidays? What values to these holidays inspire us to act on? 

PRACTICE makes PERFECT
Middot Chart.jpg
SHOW what you KNOW

Print out our list of middot (plural of middah), cut each middah out, and create a poster for each holiday celebrating its values. When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

CONGRATULATIONS!
If you've completed all of the challenges above and you've "SHOWN  what you KNOW" then you've earned the "MIRACLES" badge!
 
1. I can identify the kippah and tallit as special Jewish symbols that we wear
When you play soccer or go to dance class you wear special clothing. When Jews do Jewish things they also wear Jewish clothing. Click on each piece of "Jewish clothing" below to find out what it is. Do you know when we wear each of these? Do you know what they symbolize?
PRACTICE makes PERFECT

Click on each symbol below to find out what it is. Do you know when we use each of these symbols? Do you know what they symbolize?

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SHOW what you KNOW

Using any materials you'd like, design your own kippah or tallit. When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

2. I behave appropriately in t'fillah (prayers)
T'fillah is a very special time. To honor it, we behave differently during t'fillah than we do when we're playing soccer, doing gymnastics or even just playing with our friends. We always want to show respect during t'fillah.
PRACTICE makes PERFECT

See if you know how to show respect during t'fillah by playing our game!

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SHOW what you KNOW

Create a list of rules for how you think we should behave during t'fillah. When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

3. I can identify a Mezuzah, Torah scroll, Aron Kodesh, and Ner Tamid

Some Jewish objects can be found in our homes and synagogues. Others are only found in the synagogue.

PRACTICE makes PERFECT

Click on each symbol below to find out what it is. Do you know when we use each of these symbols? Do you know what they symbolize? Which of these are usually only found in a synagogue?

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PRACTICE makes PERFECT

See if you can match the symbols to their meanings.

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SHOW what you KNOW

Go around your home and see if you can find a mezuzah. What doors in your home have a mezuzah? Is there one on your bedroom door? If there is, take a picture of it. If there isn't create your own (with a prayer inside), put it up and tkae a picture of it. When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

4. I can show my understanding of Judaism as a way of life that guides us even when deciding what to eat

We make choices every day: What to wear to school, what to do with our friends, and even, what to eat. The Torah is great at helping us make good choices and keeping kosher is the way that the Torah helps us make good choices about what to eat.

SHOW what you KNOW

Imagine you are hosting a party. What food would you serve? Are you serving kosher food? Why or why not? When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

5. I can recite blessings over food including: Hamotzi, pri hagafen, minei m'zonot

There is so much to be thankful for - especially all of the delicious food we get to eat. Jews show thanks by saying blessings and there are different blessings for different kinds of foods. 

PRACTICE makes PERFECT

For bread we say:

 בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יי אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם הַמּוֹצִיא לֶחֶם מִן הָאָרֶץ

 

For grape juice we say:

 בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יי אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם בּוֹרֵא פְּרִי הַגֶּפֶן

 

For cookies and other baked treats we say:

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יי אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם בּוֹרֵא מִינֵי מְזוֹנוֹת

SHOW what you KNOW

Create a menu of your favorite foods. Next to each food, instead of a price, write which blessing we say over that food. When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

6. I can use Jewish vocabulary to mark significant life moments (mazal tov, shehecheyanu, yom huledet sameiach)

CONGRATULATIONS! HAPPY BIRTHDAY! It's so nice to be able to share these words with a friend or family member when they've done something wonderful or are celebrating a birthday. We can say these words in Hebrew also. We can even sing them!

PRACTICE makes PERFECT

Watch these videos to learn about the holiday rituals.

SHOW what you KNOW

Create a set of greeting cards for different celebrations using the correct greeting for each milestone. When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

CONGRATULATIONS!
If you've completed all of the challenges above and you've "SHOWN  what you KNOW" then you've earned the "LIVING JEWISHLY" badge!
 
1. I know the symbols and ritual items used on the Purim 
PRACTICE makes PERFECT

Click on each holiday symbol below to find out what it is. Do you know when we use each of these symbols? Do you know what they symbolize?

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PRACTICE makes PERFECT

See if you can match the symbols to their meanings.

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SHOW what you KNOW

Create a Purim symbol book with pictures and/or drawings of each symbol and the name of each symbol. When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

2. I can put the parts of the story of Purim in the correct order
The Purim story is an amazing tale of bravery and courage.
PRACTICE makes PERFECT

Check out this video of the Purim story and then challenge yourself to put the story in the correct order.

See if you can put the parts of the Purim story in the right order.

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SHOW what you KNOW

Create a story board telling the story of Purim with your own illustrations. When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

3. I can use the Hebrew names of the holiday

Purim means "lots". Not as in, "I ate lots of cookies", but as in "casting lots." To cast lots means to make a decision. We call this holiday Purim or "casting lots" because it was on this day that Haman cast lots and decided the day on which he would punish all the Jews for not bowing down to him.

PRACTICE makes PERFECT
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See if you know the Hebrew names of all of the holidays.

SHOW what you KNOW

Create a Purim greeting card using the correct name of the holiday in Hebrew. When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

4. I can match Purim with its appropriate season

Purim is celebrated on the 14th day of the Hebrew month of Adar, which falls in late winter/early spring (usually around March). It is one of the happiest holidays we celebrate and its comes just in time. After a long dark winter we need a little joy and celebration to prepare us for the re-birth of spring.

PRACTICE makes PERFECT

Find a calendar (hanging on your fridge or maybe on mom or dad's iphone) and see if Purim is on that calendar.

SHOW what you KNOW

Create a nature collage celebrating Purim and its season. When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

5. I can recite the holiday b’rachot (blessings)

There aren't many special blessings that we all say on Purim but there are lots of great Purim songs. There is a blessing that we say whenever we eat Hamantaschen. It's the same blessing we say when we eat any kind of cookie or cake. Look back to last month's learning and see if you can remember the blessing for cookies!

PRACTICE makes PERFECT

There aren't many special blessings that we all say on Purim but there are lots of great Purim songs. Listen to a few below.

SHOW what you KNOW

Create a video of yourself saying the blessing for Hamantaschen and eating the most delicious cookie just like Cookie Monster would. When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

6. I can identify the rituals that we do on Purim

Purim is so much fun. We dress up in funny costumes, eat hamantaschen, send gifts called mishloach manot and hear the story of Esther from the megillah - the scroll of Esther.

PRACTICE makes PERFECT

Watch these videos to learn about the holiday rituals.

SHOW what you KNOW

Make your own video tutorial about the rituals and symbols of Purim. When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

7. I can connect Jewish values to the holidays

Middot are Jewish values. A value is a belief or behavior that we all believe is important. Some Jewish values are kindness, bravery and love. You can find a list of many more middot below. Think about all that you've learned about the Yamim Noraim. What values do you think are important for these holidays? What values to these holidays inspire us to act on? 

PRACTICE makes PERFECT
Middot Chart.jpg
SHOW what you KNOW

Print out our list of middot (plural of middah), cut each middah out, and create a poster for each holiday celebrating its values. When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

CONGRATULATIONS!
If you've completed all of the challenges above and you've "SHOWN  what you KNOW" then you've earned the "JOY" badge!
 
1. I know the symbols and ritual items used on Passover
There are so many symbols and ritual items used on Passover.
PRACTICE makes PERFECT

Click on each holiday symbol below to find out what it is. Do you know when we use each of these symbols? Do you know what they symbolize?

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PRACTICE makes PERFECT

See if you can match the symbols to their meanings.

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SHOW what you KNOW

Create a Passover symbol book with pictures and/or drawings of each symbol and the name of each symbol. When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

2. I can put the parts of the story of Passover in the correct order
The story of Passover is probably the greatest story ever told!
PRACTICE makes PERFECT

One of our favorite movies that tell the story of Pesach is the Prince of Egypt. You'll have to pay to watch it so ask ima or aba but its worth it!

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See if you can put the parts of the Passover story in the right order.

SHOW what you KNOW

Create a story board telling the story of Passover with your own illustrations. When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

3. I can use the Hebrew names of the holiday

Passover in Hebrew is פֶּסַח (Pesach). The word פֶּסַח means, "pass over". The name reminds us of how God "passed over" the homes of the Israelites during the 10th plague to save the first-born sons. פֶּסַח is also called חַג הָאָבִיב (Chag Ha'aviv) or the Spring festival since Passover always falls in the spring.

PRACTICE makes PERFECT
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See if you know the Hebrew names of all of the holidays.

SHOW what you KNOW

Create a Passover Seder invitation using the Hebrew names of the holidays. When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

4. I can match Passover with its appropriate season

Jewish holidays, like פֶּסַח (Pesach), tell the story of the Jewish people. They are also connected to certain seasons of the year. פֶּסַח is also called חַג הָאָבִיב (Chag Ha'aviv) or the Spring festival, since Passover always falls in the spring. Since Passover is all about new beginnings spring-time is the perfect season for פֶּסַח. After a long and cold winter, everything is being re-born. Trees are growing new leaves, plants are sprouting from the earth and fruits and vegetables are beginning to be harvested. One of the symbols on the K'arah (seder plate) even reminds us of Passover's connection to spring. Do you remember which symbol that is?

SHOW what you KNOW

Create a nature collage celebrating Passover and its season. When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

5. I can recite the Passover b’rachot (blessings)

There are so many blessings that we say on Pesach. At our seder we say a blessing for each kind of food we eat. We begin with a blessing over wine or grape juice. Then we say a blessing over vegetables (that's karpas). After the re-telling the Passover story we say the blessing over bread (even though we eat matzah on Pesach. 

We don't just say blessings over food - we also say lots of blessings for all of the mitzvot (commandments) we are doing at the seder. There's a blessing for eating maror (the bitter herb), a blessing for washing our hands, and a special blessing for eating matzah.

Every blessing begins with the magic words:

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יי אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הָעוֹלָם

When what we're doing is a mitzvah (commandment) we add these words:

אֲשֶׁר קִדְּשָׁנוּ בְּמִצְוֹתָיו, וְצִוָּנוּ

PRACTICE makes PERFECT

Play our Passover Blessing Match Game to test your blessing knowledge. Drag each food to it's proper blessing.

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SHOW what you KNOW

Create your own audio recordings of one of the blessings that has those special "mitzvah words" to use at home. When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

6. I can identify the rituals that we do on Passover

Pesach is full of rituals. The biggest one is the seder!

PRACTICE makes PERFECT

Watch these videos to learn about the holiday rituals.

SHOW what you KNOW

Make your own video tutorial about the rituals and symbols of Passover. When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

7. I can connect Jewish values to the holidays

Middot are Jewish values. A value is a belief or behavior that we all believe is important. Some Jewish values are kindness, bravery and love. You can find a list of many more middot below. Think about all that you've learned about the Yamim Noraim. What values do you think are important for these holidays? What values to these holidays inspire us to act on? 

PRACTICE makes PERFECT
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SHOW what you KNOW

Print out our list of middot (plural of middah), cut each middah out, and create a poster for each holiday celebrating its values. When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

CONGRATULATIONS!
If you've completed all of the challenges above and you've "SHOWN  what you KNOW" then you've earned the "FREEDOM" badge!
 
1. I can identify the Israel flag and the magen David 

This is a picture of the Israeli flag. The Israeli flag has two blue stripes and a Magen David, a Star of David in the middle. The two blue stripes may remind you of another Jewish symbol that we wear when we pray. Can you figure out what symbol the Israeli flag reminds us of? Click here to jump back up to our Living Jewishly section from earlier this year to refresh your memory.

The star in the middle is called a מָגֵן דָּוִד (Magen David), which means "Shield of David" - we usually call it the Star of David. Some people think that King David had a shield in the shape of a star.

PRACTICE makes PERFECT

Let's play a game with the shape of the מָגֵן דָּוִד. 

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SHOW what you KNOW

Create your own flag of Israel. You can use any materials you'd like. Just don't forget the two blue stripes and the Magen David. When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

2. I can show my understanding that Israel is the homeland of the Jews and is also the home to many different types of people from all over the world
Israel has been a home for Jews for thousands of years. In fact, God promised Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob that Jews would always have a home in Israel. But Jews aren't the only ones living in Israel. There are lots of different kinds of people living there: Muslims, Christians, Druze and many more. 
PRACTICE makes PERFECT

Kululam brings people of all backgrounds and beliefs together to sing. Watch the video below and see how many different types of people you can find. Can you tell if they are Jewish, Christian or Muslim? What languages do you hear?

SHOW what you KNOW

Israel is a home for Jews and many other peoples. What makes your house a "home"? Imagine you are moving to Israel - what things would you want to take with you to make Israel feel like your "home"? Make a list, maybe even take pictures of those things you would want to take. When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

3. I can show my understanding that Israel is a country in which every person is free to live as they choose and practice their own beliefs

Israel is a democracy. A democracy is a type of government where the people can take part in the decisions that affect the way their community is run. In Israel, everyone has an equal voice whether they are Jewish, Christian, Muslim or any other religion. And democracy in Israel isn't just about voting. Israelis are free to live as they wish and believe whatever they want.

SHOW what you KNOW

Imagine you are a leader in the Israeli government. What freedoms would be most important for you to protect? Create a banner or poster celebrating the freedom you would stand up for.  When you feel that you've done your best work, SHOW what you KNOW.

CONGRATULATIONS!
If you've completed all of the challenges above and you've "SHOWN  what you KNOW" then you've earned the "HOPE" badge!
 

© 2020 by JPaL at Temple Sinai of North Dade

18801 NE 22nd Ave. Miami, Florida 33180

www.tsnd.org

rabbi.david@tsnd.org, 305-932-9012

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